“A Call to Arms: An Invitation to Demand Action on Climate Change”

In case you haven’t read Bill McKibben’s A Call to Arms article about climate change on the Rolling Stone website yet, here it is.

This is an invitation, an invitation to come to New York City. An invitation to anyone who’d like to prove to themselves, and to their children, that they give a damn about the biggest crisis our civilization has ever faced.

My guess is people will come by the tens of thousands, and it will be the largest demonstration yet of human resolve in the face of climate change. Sure, some of it will be exciting – who doesn’t like the chance to march and sing and carry a clever sign through the canyons of Manhattan? But this is dead-serious business, a signal moment in the gathering fight of human beings to do something about global warming before it’s too late to do anything but watch. You’ll tell your grandchildren, assuming we win. So circle September 20th and 21st on your calendar, and then I’ll explain.

Since Ban Ki-moon runs the United Nations, he’s altogether aware that we’re making no progress as a planet on slowing climate change. He presided over the collapse of global-climate talks at Copenhagen in 2009, and he knows the prospects are not much better for the “next Copenhagen” in Paris in December 2015. In order to spur those talks along, he’s invited the world’s leaders to New York in late September for a climate summit.

But the “world’s leaders” haven’t been leaders on climate change – at least not leaders enough. Like many of us, they’ve attended to the easy stuff, but they haven’t set the world on a fundamentally new course. Barack Obama is the perfect example: Sure, he’s imposed new mileage standards for cars, but he’s also opened vast swaths of territory to oil drilling and coal mining, which will take us past Saudi Arabia and Russia as the world’s biggest petro producer.

Like other world leaders, that is, he’s tried, but not nearly hard enough. Consider what he told The New Yorker in an interview earlier this year: “At the end of the day, we’re part of a long-running story. We just try to get our paragraph right.” And “I think we are fortunate at the moment that we do not face a crisis of the scale and scope that Lincoln or FDR faced.”

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